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Year 8 & 9 Options

Options overview

 

Through Years 7 and 8 students get the opportunity to study a wide range of subjects across all areas of the curriculum. We believe that it is important to allow students to start determining the subjects that they wish to study to GCSE examination standard at the end of Year 8.  For this reason, the College operates an option process that operates in both Year 8 and Year 9.

The Core Curriculum

The College has considered the subjects all students need to study for their GCSEs.  Although you cannot ‘choose’ these subjects, information about them has been included.

The core subjects are:

  • English, Mathematics and Science
  • Physical Education
  • Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE)

Year 8 options

Students will choose towards the end of Year 8 one subject that they wish to study as an ‘early entry’ GCSE. The students will study this subject intensively through Year 9 and 10 sitting a final exam in the summer of Year 10.

Alongside the early entry GCSE course, students will also choose to specialise in four further ‘regular’ option subjects in Year 9. To maintain a broad and balanced curriculum for our students at this stage we insist that each student in Year 9 studies at least one ‘Ebacc’ subject (History, Geography or Computer Science) and Modern Foreign Languages.

Year 9 options

Students will choose towards the end of Year 9 three subjects from their regular options that they will continue to study in Years 10 and 11, taking a final exam in the summer of Year 11.

Throughout the options process, students are encouraged to make informed decisions about the choices they are making. To support this, the College has an extensive careers education programme as well as systems that ensure that each student is fully counselled on the subjects they are taking (this includes a 1 to 1 personal interview with a senior member of staff in the College).

Subject Guides

These allow you to compare the subjects according to their demands – try to balance their requirements to your skills and abilities. Each subject has been rated by their teachers according to a range of factors:

  • Literacy - The level of writing and reading required.
  • Numeracy - the level of maths application involved.
  • Communications - The need to explain and share your thoughts and ideas with others.
  • Creativity - The need to think for yourself creatively.
  • Practical - The level of hands-on involvement required.
  • Group work - Working with others – being both dependant and dependable.

Options subject Guide overview video
 

 

 

 

Please find below Options Subject Guides for each individual subject, available to view digitally. If you require a printed copy in the form of an A5 booklet, please email admin@crookhorn.hants.sch.uk

Art and Design

Summary of course

GCSE Art and Design gives students the opportunity to explore materials, techniques and develop skills. The course focuses on four assessment objectives. These consist of observational drawing, analysing artists’ work and that of different cultures, developing and exploring ideas and finally a personal response. Students will complete four projects over the two years, which will make up a portfolio of coursework (60%). 

Finally students will be issued their exam paper at the end of January. Students start exam preparation and will complete their final exam in May. This is a 10-hour exam completed over 2 days, where students complete a ‘Final piece’ in response to all their preparation work completed previously (40%). All work is assessed through the 4 objectives mentioned earlier. It is marked by the teacher and then moderated with an AQA examiner. 

What it can lead to at College and beyond

GCSE Art and Design can be a stepping stone towards A Level Art, Textiles or a BTEC National Diploma in similar Art related subjects. This could then lead to degree courses (BA/ BA Hons) in various subject areas. 

Art is so diverse that future careers can be very varied and could lead to professional artist, Art teacher, illustrator, graphic designer, interior designer, printmaker, fashion designer, theatre design, ceramics and many more. 

Extra-curricular commitment requirements

As with any Art-based subject, Art is very time consuming, so you must be committed to finishing your work in your own time. We recommend that you attend Art Club regularly and complete homework which will include photography, practical work and written work; all of which will count towards your coursework portfolio. This will mean that you should also be prepared to have your own supplies for practical work that you keep at home, and access to a printer.

For more information on the course, please contact Mrs Pitassi.
 

 

 

 

Art textiles

Summary of course

As this course is on the art specification, it requires similar skills to Art and Design. Students will require a good base knowledge in painting and drawing as well as an enthusiasm for trying new things. On this course we explore the potential for fabric and embroidery to be used as tools to create art, illustration and sculpture.

The course is structured around four assessment objectives which look at your ability to research and replicate the work of various artists, experiment with materials and processes and develop ideas, record your process through photography, drawing and written annotation and to produce a personal final piece as the outcome of the project. Students will complete 3 projects during the course which will make up a portfolio of coursework (60% of overall grade).

Finally, as with Art, students will be issued with an exam paper in January of Year 11. This paper will provide project themes for the student to choose from, and complete independently before their final exam in May. This is a 10-hour exam completed over 2 days, where students will create a final piece for their chosen project, using the preparation work that they have produced (40% of overall grade). All work is then assessed by the teacher and moderated by an AQA examiner.

What it can lead to at College and beyond

GCSE Textile Arts can lead to further study at A level, either as an Art based subject or Technology Textile Design, UAL Diploma in Art or Fashion design. This could then lead to degree courses (BA/Hons) in a variety of creative subjects.

Possible future careers are Visual Artist, Art Teacher, Textiles, Fashion, Set and Costume Design, Interior Design, Buyer, Visual Merchandising, Surface Design and more.

Extra-curricular commitment requirements

As with any Art-based subject, Textile Arts is very time consuming, so you must be committed to finishing your work in your own time. We recommend that you attend Art Club regularly and complete homework which will include photography, practical work and written work; all of which will count towards your coursework portfolio. This will mean that you should also be prepared to have your own supplies for practical work that you keep at home, and access to a printer

For more information on the course, please contact Mrs Pitassi.

 

 

 

Business Studies

Summary of course

The Edexcel GCSE in Business is comprised of 2 externally assessed exams:

Theme 1 – Investigating small business

  • Enterprise and entrepreneurship.
  • Spotting a business opportunity.
  • Putting a business idea into practice.
  • Making the business effective.
  • Understanding external influences on business.

- Written examination: 1 hour and 30 minutes.
- Calculations, multiple-choice, short-answer and extended-writing questions.

Theme 2 – Building a business

  • Growing the business
  • Making marketing decisions
  • Making operational decisions
  • Making financial decisions
  • Making human resource decisions

- Written examination: 1 hour and 30 minutes.
- Calculations, multiple-choice, short-answer and extended-writing questions.

What it can lead to at College and beyond

A level 2 qualification in Business is useful if you want to study Business Studies, Accounts or Economics A Level or Business BTEC at Level 3.

Business Studies GCSE can be useful for absolutely every job. Business Studies is particularly relevant if you want to work in the Human Resources, Marketing and Finance department of either a small or large business. It is also relevant if you want to work as an accountant, stockbroker, recruitment consultant or be an entrepreneur and set up your own business.

For more information on the course, please contact Mrs Burnham

 

 

 

Catering

Summary of course

This course offers a unique opportunity for students to develop their knowledge and extend their skills within catering in a vocational context. The specification encourages the investigation and study of catering in a variety of contexts and uses a range of assessment techniques to enable students to respond through practical and investigative work. If you enjoy cooking and developing a range of skills that will develop your understanding of different foodstuffs and how to use the equipment correctly and safely, then catering is an ideal option.

Areas of study include; the industry – food and drink, job roles, employment opportunities and relevant training, health, safety and hygiene, food preparation, cooking and presentation, nutrition and menu planning, costing and portion control, specialist equipment, communication and record-keeping, and environmental considerations.

What it can lead to at College and beyond

It is a suitable qualification for those who want a broad background in this area and for those who wish to progress to further education, for example, to complete a City & Guilds catering qualification. It will also offer valuable preparation for those entering the world of work. Possible future careers in this subject: catering; hospitality; tourism; nutritionist; dietitian; health & fitness work; and medical.

Extra-curricular commitment requirements

There will be an element of cost related to the purchasing of chef’s whites, ingredients etc. and you will be responsible for providing these items each practical session (including your washed and clean whites).

For more information on the course, please contact Mrs Maun

 

 

 

Child Development

Summary of course

This course is for anyone with an interest in children, who would like to work with children, and who would like to develop their understanding of children in a diverse society. The course has 3 units, which are: health and well-being for child development; understand the equipment and nutritional needs of children from birth to five years; understand the development of a child from birth to five years.

Assessment is through a single exam paper (unit 1) and two pieces of coursework (unit 2 and 3). 

  • Unit 1: Written paper (exam) 1 hour 15 minutes 80 marks - 50%
  • Unit 2: Coursework - 25%
  • Unit 3: Coursework - 25%

What it can lead to at College and beyond

It is good for the BTEC Level 3 Health and Social Care. Some Child Development students go on to study BTEC courses in Child Studies or Nursery Nursing. It will prepare students for further qualifications in Psychology, Sociology and Biology.

You could become a children’s representative for holiday companies and work in England or abroad; a nursery nurse or trainer, primary school or nursery teacher.

Extra-curricular commitment requirements

Students are expected to carry out the observations of their chosen child for their child study assessment outside lesson time, and regularly over a period of 3 months. The child they choose for their study must be between birth and 5 years in age.

For more information on the course, please contact Mrs Bartlett

 

 

Links from video:

Exam Board information
http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/vocational-education-and-skills/cambridge-nationals-child-development-level-1-2-j818/

What the exam board and examiner have to say about the course
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9TXmLILDT6g

Computer Science

Summary of course

Computer Science offers students the opportunity to gain an understanding of the way computers work, and to create and review computer programs for real-life purposes. It encourages students to create games, applications and other systems, rather than simply use those designed by others, a high level of mathematics is required for this course. It is a linear specification and all assessments are taken at the end of the course.

During the course, in addition to the coding you will also cover:

    Algorithms and code design
    This will cover flowcharts and pseudocode.

    Computer Systems
    Included will be binary and computer architecture.
    This includes storage and compression techniques used in sound and images/video

    Computer Architecture
    You will learn about the in-depth operation of the processor

    Networks
    The benefits and dangers of networks will be discussed in this unit.

    Databases
    In this short unit, you will look at the use of databases.

    Computers in society
    You will study the use and misuse of computers and the legal (and moral) issues that this entails

Assessment is entirely done by examination covering the various parts of the course.

For more information on the course, please contact Mr O'Sullivan

 

 

 

Creative iMedia

Summary of course

Creative iMedia is a “hands-on” practical based subject using transferrable skills in ICT. The idea is that students will develop skills in pre-production and media design.

The course is made up of 4 units:

Unit 1 (R081) Pre-production.
Students are introduced to a range of essential pre-production techniques used in the creative and digital media, including client brief, time frames, deadlines and preparation techniques

Unit 2 (R082) Creating Digital Graphics
Building on the skills and understanding that they have developed in the previous unit, students explore where and why digital graphics are used and the techniques that are involved in their creation. They apply their skills and knowledge in creating digital graphics against a specific brief.

Unit 3 (R083) Creating 2D and 3D digital characters
Students develop their understanding of the basics of character modelling, both 2D and 3D, for the digital media sector, including the software used to create them, and they plan and create a digital character against a specific brief.

Unit 4 (R085) Creating a multi-page website
Students explore the different properties, purposes and features of multi-page websites. They demonstrate their creativity by combining components to create a functional, intuitive and visually pleasing website.

The OCR Level 1/2 Cambridge National Certificate in Creative iMedia consists of two mandatory units and two optional units.

For more information on the course, please contact Mr O'Sullivan

 

 

 

dance

Why Study Performing Arts?

Would you like to take a hands-on, practical course along-side your GCSEs that gives you a taste of what the Performing Arts sector is like, as well as giving you the skills and confidence to succeed in your next steps?

With an RSL Award in Creative and Performing Arts, you are able to explore, challenge and realise your potential. During the course, you can see whether the industry is one you want to be in, where you could go, and gain knowledge and skills you need to succeed in your next steps.

About the course:

This course is equivalent to one GCSE and consists of two units. You will be assessed on your practical work, use of rehearsal, and coursework. Therefore most of your classwork can count towards your grade which is why it is vital that you complete the tasks to the best of your ability at all times. The course is mainly practical and consists of some written elements such as evaluating your own performances and planning.

Unit 229 Ensemble dance
Aims:

1. Work collaboratively to rehearse a dance piece
2. Perform in the chosen dance genre demonstrating:
    a. Knowledge and understanding of the technique and vocabulary of the chosen genre
    b. Co-ordination
    c. Musicality
    d. Physical awareness and control
    e. Spatial awareness
3. Reflect on the performance and their own contribution and identify strengths and areas for development. Describe what they most enjoyed and found most challenging about the style

Evidence:
End product:

You will create your own group dances using a stimulus. You will choose your own theme, music and costume and add in a range of choreography and performance skills.

You will submit:
- A recording of your performance
- An evaluation of your performance
- Log books of the rehearsal process

Unit 201: Final Performance - Brief from RSL
This unit is split into three sections:

Task 1: Plan for live performance (7 hours)
- Statement of aims, propose ideas, production plan and health and safety

Task 2: Demonstrate skills to perform in a live environment (10 hours)
- Video of the live performance

Task 2: Review your performance (3 hours)
· Report or videoed evaluation

Task 3: Reflect on the performance (3 hours)
- Evaluation

For more information on the course, please contact Miss Grundy

 

 

 

drama

Why Study Performing Arts?

Would you like to take a hands-on, practical course along-side your GCSEs that gives you a taste of what the Performing Arts sector is like, as well as giving you the skills and confidence to succeed in your next steps?

With an RSL Award in Creative and Performing Arts, you are able to explore, challenge and realise your potential. During the course, you can see whether the industry is one you want to be in, where you could go, and gain knowledge and skills you need to succeed in your next steps.

About the course:

This course is equivalent to one GCSE and consists of two units. You will be assessed on coursework therefore most of your classwork can count towards coursework which is why it is vital that you complete the tasks to the best of your ability at all times. 

Unit 212 Performing Text
Aims: 
To develop the skills necessary for analysing a piece of dialogue in drama to be able to perform it appropriately. 
To explore a range of practical skills, using both classic and modern texts. 

Evidence:
End product: 
You will study and perform an extract from two contrasting play texts to showcase your skills learned during practical workshops.

You will submit: 
- A recording of your performances 
- A written context of both texts 
- An evaluation of your performance 
- Log books of the rehearsal process

Unit 201: Final Performance - Brief from RSL
This unit is split into three sections:

Task 1: Plan for live performance (7 hours) 
- Production plan, job roles and health and safety considerations (Powerpoint)

Task 2: Demonstrate skills to perform in a live environment (10 hours) 
- Rehearsals for the performance (Approximately 10 minutes)and actual performance

Task 3: Reflect on the performance (3 hours) 
- Evaluation

For more information on the course, please contact Mrs Callaghan

 

 

 

English Language

Summary of course   (please note English Language is not an ‘optional’ subject)

You will study this course in parallel with English Literature.

For the Component 1 Exam, you will refine your skills as a reader of modern literary prose texts and develop your creative writing skills. For the Component 2 Exam, you will refine your skills as a reader of a range of non-fiction texts (from the nineteenth century onwards) and develop your non-fiction transactional writing skills.

Throughout the course you will develop and refine your skills as a listener and a speaker in a variety of situations- individually, in groups and in role. You will be able to analyse how language works in action.

By the end of the course you will achieve a GCSE in English Language… and you will be a confident, independent, critical thinker as well as a rounded, articulate and successful communicator!

What it can lead to at College and beyond

Success in English Language will, of course, lay the foundations for your work in English Language or Literature at AS level. But the listening, speaking, reading and writing skills you will develop will also be useful across a range of arts, humanities and social science subjects, and the evaluation skills you will develop will be useful in each and every subject, both at Sixth Form, College or in higher education. 

In fact, the ability to use English successfully will open doors for life!

Extra-curricular commitment requirements

You will be expected to complete regular study skill, reading or writing homework. Booster classes will be offered in order to help you take your work to the next grade.

For more information on the course, please contact Mr Bezant

English Literature

Summary of course   (please note English Literature is not an ‘optional’ subject)

You will study this course in parallel with English Language.

You will develop and refine your skills as a critical, independent reader of the three forms of fiction, as you study and respond to a wide range of texts – novels, poetry and drama, including Shakespeare. 

For the Component 1 Exam, you will study and respond to a play by Shakespeare and a range of classic and modern poetry. For the Component 2 Exam, you will read and respond to a modern novel or play, nineteenth-century prose and unseen poetry.

By the end of the course you will achieve a GCSE in English Literature… and you will be an independent, confident, rounded and articulate critical reader.

What it can lead to at College and beyond

Success in English Literature will, of course, lay the foundations for your work in English Literature or Language/Literature at AS level, and possibly for Drama too. 

In addition, the critical reading and writing skills you will develop will also be useful across a range of arts, humanities and social science subjects, and the evaluation skills you will develop will be useful in each and every subject, both at Sixth Form, College or in higher education. 

Extra-curricular commitment requirements

You will be expected to complete regular study skill, reading or writing homework. Booster classes will be offered in order to help you take your work to the next grade.

For more information on the course, please contact Mr Bezant

Geography

Summary of course

Geography helps make the world make sense. This GCSE course offers you the opportunity to explore the planet from the comfort of your classroom! Throughout the course you will look into a variety of exciting places, events and actions which have shaped the world we live in – piecing together the physical, human and environmental features around us to understand the bigger picture of this incredible planet.

The course will appeal to the naturally inquisitive and includes subject content questioning issues as varied as ‘Can cities really prepare for earthquakes?’, ‘How on earth did that erratic rock get there?’ and ‘How can I investigate that?’

We will be looking at new areas of geography not studied at KS3 including global futures for water resource management, river processes and landscapes, and geographical applications of fieldwork, alongside familiar areas of earthquakes, development and the UK.

In opting to study GCSE geography you must commit to learning outside the classroom on fieldwork; a full day in the field completing investigation tasks. This links to the Geographical applications exam, assessing investigation issues and fieldwork techniques. There are two further exams; one physical and one human testing geographical skills, knowledge and the application of examples and case studies. 

What it can lead to at College and beyond

Geography develops your skills of analysis, investigation and decision making. The skills you will pick up during the course are easily transferable to many walks of life, from planning, environmental work, geology, teaching, park ranger... the list is endless! 

Geography is a subject highly valued by employers across industries. Geography graduates are less likely to be unemployed after university than those studying other subjects and earn above the average salary (74% of geography graduates earn a starting salary of more than £20,000 per year, above the overall average of 70%). 

Extra-curricular commitment requirements

There are a number of compulsory extra-curricular commitments for the completion of fieldwork-based tasks. Additionally, you will be encouraged to attend revision clinics and to come on trips to bring to life the geography studied in the classroom and support your progress to reach your targets. Enrichment opportunities for subject development are also provided for all.

For more information on the course, please contact Mrs Edington

 

 

 

History

Summary of course

This popular GCSE course at Crookhorn includes an exciting evaluation of:

  1. the astonishing, turbulent history of Germany 1919-39, which covers the meteoric rise and catastrophic collapse of the Nazi regime.
  2. the USA 1929-2000: from the gruelling Depression, World War Two, Cold War, Vietnam War to Rock ‘n’ Roll, the Hippie movement, Civil Rights, Man on the moon and right up to the age of the computer and the Internet.
  3. the Elizabethan Age 1558 - 1603 a time of discovery, piracy, the Spanish Armada, crime and Tudor life and times, as well as the personality of Elizabeth herself.
  4. changes in Health and Medicine in Britain, c.500 to the present day, examines the sometimes disgusting causes of illness and disease... the often gruesome attempts to treat it, through to the developments that created our current system.

When it is safe to do so there will be numerous opportunities for learning beyond the classroom, from theatre trips, university trips and visiting guest speakers.

What it can lead to at College and beyond

As well as a fascinating and enthralling subject, history informs your present and guides your futures in every sense: you will learn to weigh up evidence, offer an opinion, and communicate informed ideas clearly and confidently, both verbally and in writing. These are skills employers value greatly. 

It is a highly desirable qualification for journalists, law-makers, economists, accountants, project managers, teachers, archaeologists, museums curators, media producers within the theatre, medics and intelligence services (police or MI5/MI6) – any time you need to weigh the evidence and make important conclusions!

Extra-curricular commitment requirements

Young historians will research and revise independently in addition to the offered revision sessions and they can also take advantage of other enrichment opportunities like trips, university sessions, theatre workshops, revision DVDs and guest speakers.

For more information on the course, please contact Mrs Masson

 

 

 

Mathematics

Summary of course   (please note mathematics is not an ‘optional’ subject)

Mathematics is offered at two levels of entry; Higher and Foundation. Students wishing to follow Mathematics beyond Key Stage 4 must study Higher. The course covers all aspects of Mathematics and is assessed by a terminal examination made up of three papers. These are 2 x calculator and 1 x non-calculator. In addition to this, all students are assessed each half term to ensure progress is maintained.

At GCSE we build upon the work covered at Key Stage 3 and prepare students to be efficient in the use of mathematics in real-life applications. In the Mathematics faculty, we embrace new technologies but these are underpinned by the traditional approaches to the subject that are required in the wider world. A successful mathematician will be able to show organisation, logic and ordering skills in order to break a problem down to smaller, more manageable tasks.

What it can lead to at College and beyond

Mathematics is required for practically every job that you can imagine. Most job advertisements will request Mathematics at a pass grade at GCSE. The skills developed will demonstrate that problems can be identified and broken down. 

As an A level subject it is widely considered to be the most marketable, opening doors into careers in ICT, law, engineering, medicine, science and business. The skills that you will develop are universal and can be implemented in many areas.

Extra-curricular commitment requirements

Students will be expected to complete a weekly homework of up to 1 hour in length. In addition, students will be asked to practice basic skills using the ICT available. 

For more information on the course, please contact Mr Patel

Modern foreign languages - french

Summary of course

Students will study a range of topics including holidays, health and lifestyle, education and future career paths and personal relationships.

  • Listening - Listening, speaking, reading and writing all count for 25% towards final grade and are assessed by the final exam. 
  • Writing - Writing will take the form of short and longer written responses to stimuli at either Foundation or Higher Level. 
  • Speaking - Speaking interactions will include a role-play task, a photo-based discussion and free discussion on various topics. 
  • Reading - Reading will include a translation element, both into English and into the Target language.

What it can lead to at College and beyond

French can be studied as an A-Level at college or taken as a supplementary unit for courses such as cabin crew and leisure and tourism. Some universities (Edinburgh and UCL) and courses, like Law, require a language GCSE.  If applicants do not have this qualification, then they may be required to work independently in their first year to achieve one.

Speaking different languages can open up a wealth of opportunities, from increasing our cultural awareness to making us more employable. In a CBI survey, 72% of businesses valued language skills amongst their employees. 

Extra-curricular commitment requirements

Students will be expected to do writing, reading and vocabulary learning tasks once a week.

GCSE help clinics run one lunchtime a week, or by arrangement with the teacher. There will be revision sessions for listening and reading in Year 11.

For more information on the course, please contact Ms Clarke
 

 

 

 

Modern foreign languages - spanish

Summary of course

Students will study a range of topics including holidays, health and lifestyle, education and future career paths and personal relationships.

  • Listening - Listening, speaking, reading and writing all count for 25% towards final grade and are assessed by the final exam. 
  • Writing - Writing will take the form of short and longer written responses to stimuli at either Foundation or Higher Level. 
  • Speaking - Speaking interactions will include a role-play task, a photo-based discussion and free discussion on various topics. 
  • Reading - Reading will include a translation element, both into English and into the Target language.

What it can lead to at college and beyond

Spanish can be studied as an A-Level at college or taken as a supplementary unit for courses such as cabin crew and leisure and tourism. Some universities (Edinburgh and UCL) and courses, like Law, require a language GCSE.  If applicants do not have this qualification, then they may be required to work independently in their first year to achieve one.

Speaking different languages can open up a wealth of opportunities, from increasing our cultural awareness to making us more employable. In a CBI survey, 72% of businesses valued language skills amongst their employees. 

Extra-curricular commitment requirements

Students will be expected to do writing, reading and vocabulary learning tasks once a week.

GCSE help clinics run one lunchtime a week, or by arrangement with the teacher. There will be revision sessions for listening and reading in Year 11.

For more information on the course, please contact Ms Clarke

(Please see the French Modern Foreign Language above for Subject video)

music

Summary of course

The RSL Level 2 Certificate for Music Practitioners is a practical, challenging and vocational course. The course allows students to undertake a rounded musical experience, focusing on and developing their creative and practical music skills, as well as gaining an understanding of the features behind various forms of modern music. The Certificate is made up of 3 units:

Live Music Performance
There is no final exam in music, but this unit is delivered under controlled conditions and is externally assessed by RSL. Students must plan, rehearse, perform and evaluate a set of songs for a gig, focusing on instrumental/vocal and performance skills. (Rehearsal lessons throughout Year 10 and assessed in Year 11).

Musical Knowledge
Students study 9 key styles of popular music, then produce written coursework researching two styles in detail and then analysing the musical features of a song. (Preparations in Year 10 and final assessments in Year 11).

Composing Music
Students will learn composing techniques using instruments and music technology for a style of their choosing, and research songs in their chosen style. They will then produce a song or instrumental piece, followed by an evaluation. (Year 10).

What it can lead to at College and beyond

The course has been fully accredited and is recognised by colleges. There are many different music options available at local colleges and this comprehensive course lends itself well to the transition on to these courses. This vocational music course will be very beneficial to anyone interested in working in the music industry (as performers, composers, technicians, journalists, etc.), education and beyond. 

If you don’t choose to study music at college, then it is a great addition to your CV; demonstrating commitment, creativity, confidence, aural skills, teamwork and analytical writing.

Extra-curricular commitment requirements

It is essential that you have sufficient instrumental or vocal ability to opt for Music. You will need to demonstrate skill and relevant evidence for the performing, composing and understanding elements of the course. You will need to check with the Head of Music if you will be able to access the course. 

From the start of the course, all students will be required to commit to instrumental/vocal lessons, which are compulsory and provided with an extra discount at our Saturday Music School, unless you already have private lessons outside of school.

For more information on the course, please contact Mr Armstrong

 

 

 

photography

Summary of course

A practical course for those who are keen to develop their skills in taking photographs, the course leads you through the principles of the camera, how to take charge of all the controls, the uses and styles of photography and leads to produce exhibition standard work. There will be critical analysis of work by professional photographers.

60% of your grade will come from coursework based around key genres of landscape, portrait, still life and practical documentary photography. The other 40% comes from an externally set, controlled conditions task. 

You will gain a GCSE Art and Design (Photography) qualification.

What it can lead to at College and beyond

If you wish to study photography further, all local colleges offer A-Level or Level 3 courses.

If you choose not to pursue the course to a higher level you will have built useful skills that could benefit you in any job where photography is needed to support a website or other promotional resources.  However, even if you choose not to continue your photographic career, at least you have the skills to take great family and holiday snaps!

Extra-curricular commitment requirements

Outside of class, you will be required to take photographs for your coursework portfolio in your own time. You will also be encouraged to take photographs at college events to support and promote your House.

For more information on the course, please contact Mr Brunink

 

 

 

physical education

Summary of course

GCSE P.E is an option subject that creates opportunities for students to further their understanding and ability in a number of topics including applied anatomy and physiology, physical training, socio-cultural influences, sports psychology, health, fitness and well-being.

Students will expect to spend approximately 30% of their allocated GCSE P.E time doing practical activities and 70% studying the theoretical part of the course, reflecting the course structure and how it is broken down.

What it can lead to at College and beyond

Students can go on to college to study A-levels in PE, sports studies, BTEC sport and other sport-related courses.

Careers include P.E teacher, sports coach, sports development, sports manager, nutritionist/dietitian, police officer, firefighter, sports scientist, athlete, a variety of careers in the armed forces and more.

Extra-curricular commitment requirements

We encourage all of our students, especially those who have opted for a qualification within the P.E department, to continue to participate in their chosen sport in a club outside of lessons. We would also encourage our GCSE PE students to assist with coaching younger students during extra-curricular clubs and matches. 

For more information on the course, please contact Mr Watson

 

 

 

Religious Studies

Summary of course

AQA Specification A: Christianity, Islam and Themes

The first exam (1hr 45mins) consists of two papers, one covering the beliefs and practices of Christianity and the other covering the beliefs and practices of Islam.

The core beliefs and practices are examined in both religions, with reference to the holy books and the differences between believers within each religion.

The second exam (1hr 45mins) is one paper that consists on questions evaluating ethical themes.

We cover four themes:

  • Relationships and families.
  • Religion and life.
  • Religion, peace and conflict.
  • Religion, crime and punishment.

These themes are looked at from both the student’s personal point of view, non-religious views and the law within contemporary society, as well as the different views within Islam and Christianity. Students will cover issues such as abortion, euthanasia, marriage and divorce, war, pacifism and the use of the death penalty.

In order to prepare students for their final examinations, they will be taught key exam skills, with regular testing to ensure progress, as well as developing a depth of understanding of key issues through debate, case studies and contemporary news items.

What it can lead to at College and beyond

Religious Education is useful for further study at College and University, due to the skills it develops. For example, evaluation and debate. Many employers value R.S. because it promotes understanding of people and cultures, which are important in any workplace. R.S. is advantageous for people considering a career in any caring profession or the public sector, such as the police, military, teaching, journalism, medicine, customer service, hospitality, social services or sales and advertising.

Extra-curricular commitment requirements

Students are expected to keep up-to-date with current affairs through newspapers, television, the Internet and radio, as well as attending revision sessions and going on course-related trips.

For more information on the course, please contact Mrs Jones

 

 

 

science (combined)

Summary of course   (please note science is not an ‘optional’ subject)

This is a double award GCSE which means it is equivalent to two GCSEs. Students studying this course will be taught the three disciplines of Biology, Chemistry and Physics in the traditional fashion.

Assessment is terminal (at the end of Year 11) and consists of six exams in total (two for Biology, two for Chemistry and two for Physics). All the papers are 1 hour and 15 minutes in duration and are available in foundation and higher tiers. The papers are equally weighted at 16.7% each and are made up from multiple-choice, structured closed and short answer as well as open answer questions.

‘Required Practicals’ are part of the science GCSEs and in combined science there are 21. These are practical tasks that the students will need to complete during the course to help develop investigation skills and they will be assessed as part of the terminal exams.

What it can lead to at College and beyond

Students following the combined science course can expect to follow ‘pure’ science A-Levels like Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

Careers including healthcare, engineering, forensic science, veterinary science and medicine, which are all areas that science is relevant to. There are also many other jobs that use science in different forms.

Extra-curricular commitment requirements

You will be expected to undertake independent review and revision of the topics studied throughout the course. There will be regular end of topic tests as well as mock tests throughout the course to prepare you for the demands of the terminal exams. Revision sessions will be compulsory in the run-up to the exams. Intervention support will be given to students not achieving their full potential.

For more information on the course, please contact Mr Russell

science (triple)

Summary of course

Students following the Triple Science course will achieve 3 GCSEs in the Science disciplines of Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Triple science covers more content than combined science and provides a very comprehensive foundation to those students who intend to follow the pure sciences at A-Level.

Assessment is terminal (at the end of Year 11) and will consist of 6 exams in total. Two exams in each subject area. Each exam has a 50% weighting for the GCSE and the duration of the exam is 1 hour and 45 minutes. As in combined science, there are ‘required practicals’ that the students will undertake throughout the course to develop scientific investigation skills as well as reinforce understanding. There are 28 practicals in total and these will be assessed as part of the terminal examination.

What it can lead to at College and beyond

Students following the separate science route can expect to follow ‘pure’ science A-Levels such as Biology, Human Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

Potential future careers may include opportunities to work in engineering, forensic science, veterinary science and medicine.

The skills developed through this course of investigation, research, presentation of findings and evaluation are widely valued by higher education and employers.

Extra-curricular commitment requirements

This is a demanding course and students will be expected to undertake independent review and revision of the topics studied throughout the course. There will be regular end of topic tests as well as mock tests throughout the course to prepare students for the demands of the terminal exams. Revision sessions will be compulsory in the run-up to the exams. Intervention support will be given to students not achieving their full potential.

For more information on the course, please contact Mr Russell

sociology

Summary of course

Sociology is the study of societies, how they work and change. You will learn about how societies shape peoples’ ideas and behaviour and how in turn people shape their societies.

You will study two main components which cover the following topic areas:

Component 1: Understanding social processes

  • Key concepts and processes of cultural transmission
  • Families
  • Education
  • Sociological research methods

Component 2: Understanding social structures

  • Social differentiation and stratification
  • Crime and deviance
  • Applied methods of sociological enquiry

Along with these topics, students will be studying a range of different theories including: Functionalism, Marxism and Feminism. They will have to relate their knowledge of these topics to the different theories to argue and evaluate different perspectives.

During the course you will have the opportunity to visit the British Museum; the Houses of Parliament and the Old Bailey in London to build on topics studied in class
 
At the end of the course there are two written assessments, each worth 50% of the overall grade, with a mix of short answer, structured questions and extended response questions. There is one for each component studied.

What it can lead to at College and beyond

It is a discipline accepted by universities and employers alike. It would be an excellent subject to choose if you are considering college courses in sociology, media, criminology, psychology or law. Students of sociology go on to a hugely diverse range of careers, from jobs in the media, such as researchers and journalists, to teaching and lecturing, to police work, to social work and health care; the list is endless!

Extra-curricular commitment requirements

As a new subject that you won’t have studied before you need to complete regular homework outside of college and attend revision classes as necessary to support with your revision.

For more information on the course, please contact Mrs Hope

 

 

 

Technology - Construction

Summary of course

The Level 1 / 2 Awards in Construction and Built Environment allow students to understand what core skills are required for the construction industry.

You will develop a range of skills both practical and academic, through applied learning that will be useful in the workplace and for future learning.

The course provides a foundation of knowledge about the construction industry that will help learners progress to further study or enter the workplace.

It motivates learners through purposeful tasks set in a construction industry context.

Subject areas covered during course

  • Electrical systems
  • Decorating
  • Carpentry/Joinery
  • Planning in construction
  • Health and Safety in the workplace

How it’s assessed

Unit 1   Safety and security in construction    30 marks
Unit 2   Practical Construction Skills                 60 marks
Unit 3   Planning construction projects            30 marks

What it can lead to at college and beyond?

Level 3 Construction at College or apprenticeship scheme after leaving Crookhorn College.

extra-curricular commitment requirements

When completing the internally assessed sections of the course students will be required to use the technology facilities to keep up with the demands of the course.

For more information on the course, please contact Mr Trott

 

 

 

Technology - engineering

Summary of course

This course offers a range of engineering skills that are relevant to those considering an engineering course or apprenticeship post 16, or those looking to progress through ‘A’ levels in preparation for an engineering degree. Many skills will also support progression in Architecture. The BTEC Technical Award gives learners the opportunity to develop engineering knowledge and skills in a practical learning environment. The main focus is on four areas of equal importance, which cover the:

  • development of key engineering practical and technical skills, such as research, observation, measurement, making, using computer-aided design (CAD) and disassembly.
  • knowledge of key engineering sectors (mechanical, electrical/electronic and engineering design) and the interrelation of each in industry.
  • knowledge of the stages involved in planning and implementing an engineering project.
  • knowledge and skills involved in the investigation of solutions to engineering problems in response to a given brief.

Internal controlled assessment: Components 1 and 2 are assessed through internal assessment. This makes up 60% of the course.

External assessment: Component 3: The set task is made up of two parts and will be completed in two hours for Part 1 and one and a half hours for Part 2. This makes up 40% of the course.

Engineering is a career that includes report writing, designing, both hand-drawn and computer-aided, as well as analysing engineered products so a good literacy level is required. This is the most academic of the technology options, please speak to Mr Morgan if you are unsure if you are suited to the course.

What it can lead to at College and beyond

Upon completion, learners can progress to a wide range of Level 3 engineering qualifications, A level Engineering and A-level Design and Technology. There are also engineering apprenticeships available locally that means you can earn and study together.

Extra-curricular commitment requirements

When completing the internally assessed sections of the course students will be required to use the technology facilities to keep up with the demands of the course.

For more information on the course, please contact Mr Morgan

 

 

 

Technology - graphics

Summary of course

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils learn the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making to complete a GCSE in Design and Technology. This Graphics course will encourage students to use their imagination to create, design and make prototypes that solve real and relevant problems, considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values. This will be an innovative course that offers students the chance to be creative, enterprising and original. If you are a student looking to build upon your creative design and technical skillset, then this would be the ideal GCSE option for you.

Students will also acquire subject knowledge in Design and Technology that builds on Y7 & 8, specialising in Paper and Board. The course will incorporate knowledge and understanding of different materials and manufacturing processes in order to design and make, with confidence, working prototypes. Designers are creative problem solvers, where each brief represents a fresh challenge, enabling students to learn how to take design risks and think innovatively. The theory aspect of this course will complement the practical element to create well-rounded and knowledgeable design students.
 
Students should develop an awareness of practices from the creative, paper engineering and manufacturing industries and understand the career paths associated with Graphic Design. Career opportunities within this field include working in digital design, print, advertising, marketing, animation, or illustration.  

How it’s assessed

Component 1
Written Exam, 50% of the qualification, 100 marks.
Each examination paper consists of 2 sections.  Core knowledge and Paper and Board specialist section.

Component 2
Non-Examined Assessment, 50% of the qualification, 100 marks.
Students will undertake a project based on a contextual challenge.  This section is internally assessed and externally moderated.

What it can lead to at College and beyond

Upon completion, learners can progress to level 3 Graphics college courses. Or take an apprenticeship within a field where the learner can use the skills developed on the course and further progress into a specialist field.

Extra-curricular commitment requirements

When completing the internally assessed sections of the course students will be required to use the technology facilities to keep up with the demands of the course.

For more information on the course, please contact Mrs Breeze